Transforming business fortunes with open and connected Big Data Analytics

 

The world of business has reached a tipping point. The markets are increasingly competitive, yet 80 percent of the companies vying for a share of this business have failed to fully embrace the world of digital information and Big Data. Future success in this brave new world is wholly dependent on businesses using predictive analysis and harvesting the vast amounts of data that are available. Only the top 5 percent of companies, in other words, the ones that are brave enough to embrace the power of transformation and harness the potential of Big Data will succeed. That was the message from Chris Rowe of EMC Greenplum. The ‘Big Daddy of Big Data’ didn’t pull any punches when he addressed the audience of enterprise delegates at this year’s Whitehall Media Big Data Analytics conference.

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Government ICT strategy: one year one and counting

The government’s Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Strategy, published in 2010, set out the way in which the government ICT landscape would change over the current spending review period: it included 30 points of action which it believed would lay the foundations for achieving the Strategy’s core objectives of reducing waste and project failure and stimulating economic growth, creating a common ICT infrastructure, using ICT to enable and deliver change and strengthening governance. The government maintained that all these changes were crucial if the UK’s ICT structure was to be cost-effective and fit for purpose in the Twenty First Century. Now, twelve months after the implementation of the strategic plan, the government has published its first annual review which sets out exactly how much progress has been achieved to date, and assesses whether it is on track to meet each of its key targets. In this article, we’ll have a look at the first of the government’s 3 strategic targets – reducing waste and stimulating economic growth through spending controls. Continue reading…


IDM 2012: delivering effective Identity Management policy in the workplace

Many experts claim that the identity-management market is reaching a crossroads. Whilst the complexity of managing users across organisations and the security requirements to preserve privacy and prevent identity theft are increasing, IT budgets for the best technology are falling because of the continuing recession. However, although we may now be firmly in the midst of a double-dip recession, the IAM market is proving to be fairly robust and resilient. IAM is a critical component of any enterprise’s security strategy, and consequently receives higher prioritization than other enterprise technologies. Many of the major companies have indicated that they are prepared to spend as much as 8 percent of their overall security budgets on IAM. It’s estimated that the IAM market will continue to grow and could be worth as much as £10 billion by the end of 2013. The reasons for this are obvious: IAM products will continue to attract attention and investment because they are part of a critical technology that lets businesses improve and automate access management processes. Continue reading…